biplane

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The biplane, with its two parallel wings separated by struts, is more easily braced and proportionately stronger. The lift is also greater, due to the additional wing surface. The vacuum made over the lower wing is interfered with by the upper plane, and thus neutralizes somewhat the lifting and flying efficiency of the upper wing. Since a plane must reverse all its stresses when looping, the double supports of the biplane make it less susceptible to doubling up and falling. These are some of the reasons for the popularity of the biplane.[1]

The two parallel airfoils can be "staggered" — with the above surface forward, rather than directly above the lower plane. In this configuration, the upper surface "is removed from the area of action of the lower aerofoil and engages undisturbed air."[2]

Enclosing categories airplane
Subcategories
Keywords airfoil
Start year
End year


Patents in category biplane

References

  1. David, 1919, Aircraft, p. 29.
  2. White, 1918, Practical Aviation, p. 10.